Jonnelle Marte writes about a new IRS service that allows taxpayers who have had a fraudulent return filed in their name  view said fraudulent return in order to help victims determine how much personal information has been compromised. The article begins as follows:

After learning that a fraudulent tax return has been filed in their name, taxpayers are often left to wonder how much of their personal information was stolen.

The IRS has long prevented identity theft victims from seeing copies of the phony returns filed in their name — which might give taxpayers an idea of how much of their personal information was compromised — citing privacy concerns. But that is changing now.

Taxpayers who have had fraudulent tax returns filed and accepted in their name can now request a copy of the fake return, according to instructions posted on the IRS’s Web site. Victims will get redacted copies of the forms, but the documents should still include enough details to help taxpayers figure out how much of their personal information was stolen.

Read the full article from the Washington Post here.

Posted by Logan Davis, Associate Editor, Wealth Strategies Journal.