Dr. Jessica Nutik Zitter writes, in the New York Times, about an incident earlier in her career where her hospital did not correctly identify the medical decision maker.

Our patient was never going to wake up. He had an unrecoverable brain injury. The prognosis had become clear over time. As the patient’s attending physician in the intensive care unit, I arranged a meeting with his sister, the only visitor we’d seen for days, and explained. She was resolute. “He’ll wake up,” she said. “He’s a fighter. Do everything you can to keep him alive.”

The next day I told the social worker what the patient’s sister had said. “What about the wife?” the social worker asked.

That was the first I’d heard of a wife. A spouse is the official next of kin. No decision should ever be made without the spouse. But I hadn’t known she existed. I discovered that she visited the patient after her work shift, usually at 8 p.m. By that hour, our team was gone. The doctors on night duty were on for emergencies, not conversation. And so she was invisible to us.

via Who Can Speak for the Patient? – NYTimes.com.

Posted by Lewis J. Saret, Co-General Editor, Wealth Strategies Journal.