Paul L. Caron, from the Pepperdine University School of Law, writes about Kenneth Scheve’s new book, Taxing the Rich: A History of Fiscal Fairness in the U.S. and Europe in a recent blog post. The post begins as follows:

In today’s social climate of acknowledged and growing inequality, why are there not greater efforts to tax the rich? In this wide-ranging and provocative book, Kenneth Scheve and David Stasavage ask when and why countries tax their wealthiest citizens—and their answers may surprise you.

Taxing the Rich draws on unparalleled evidence from twenty countries over the last two centuries to provide the broadest and most in-depth history of progressive taxation available. Scheve and Stasavage explore the intellectual and political debates surrounding the taxation of the wealthy while also providing the most detailed examination to date of when taxes have been levied against the rich and when they haven’t. Fairness in debates about taxing the rich has depended on different views of what it means to treat people as equals and whether taxing the rich advances or undermines this norm.

Click here to read the entire article and to learn more about Scheve’s new book.

Posted by Logan Davis, Associate Editor, Wealth Strategies Journal.