Paula Span reports on the sharp rise in unmarried partners over the age of 50 in recent years. This trend partly reflects the sheer size of the baby boom cohort, as well as its rising divorce rate. But attitudes have shifted, too. “People who’ve divorced have a more expansive view of what relationships are like,” said Deborah Carr, the Rutgers University sociologist who served as chairwoman of the Population Association panel.

In later life, cohabitation — like remarriage — brings companionship and wider social circles, not to mention sexual intimacy, at ages when people might otherwise face isolation. It also offers certain economic protections, since you are not responsible for a cohabitation partner’s debt as you would with a legal spouse’s debt. In many ways, cohabitation among older people remains improvisational, only recently a common phenomenon, one that couples shape to suit them.

See full post at: More Older Couples Are ‘Shacking Up’ – The New York Times

Posted by Jacqueline Groccia, Associate Editor, Wealth Strategies Journal.