Jeff Bennion discusses the reliability of cloud computing technology for protecting the confidentiality of client cases. Various state bar organizations have issued standards for cloud usage, but have typically provided vague guidelines for what is and isn’t acceptable. Because of this, Bennion suggests that in order to preserve the reputation of your firm and prevent client information from escaping into the public sphere, you need to be diligent about how you use cloud technology.

The beginning of the article reads as follows:

I think that cloud computing is one of the biggest technology revolutions in recent history. It gives us the ability to share large files, backup and sync files across multiple computers, and undelete things. As a solo, it’s not just a convenience, but it also has huge implications for me – I can grow my practice or shrink my practice without having to buy storage servers and enter into IT maintenance contracts. I can also access my cloud-stored files remotely from my phone or from home and spend less days in the office.

As we all know, the way lawyers store our confidential files is highly regulated. Cloud storage means that your files are stored on someone else’s server in some other location and you remotely access those files. So, can you or should you do that? Is it ethical to store your highly confidential files in someone else’s office? The answer is mostly yes. The ABA has put together a chart of the ethics opinions of the bar organizations that have looked into whether its lawyers can store client files in the cloud.

Find the full article here

Posted by Pooja Shivaprasad, Associate Editor, Wealth Strategies Journal