Paul Caron in his article discusses the dynamic nature of wealth acquisition of US billionaires compared to the significantly older population of billionaires in Europe who primarily inherit their wealth. This may be due to growth of the financial and technology sectors in the US, causing US billionaires to become richer on average over time.

The article begins as follows:

This working paper presents a new dataset on the sources of billionaire wealth and uses it to describe changes in extreme wealth in the United States, Europe, and other advanced countries. Th e data classify wealth as either self-made or inherited and identify the company and industry from which it comes. Among self-made billionaires, individuals are further classified as company founders, executives, politically-connected, or in finance. Data analysis shows that the superrich in the United States are more dynamic than in Europe. Just over half of European billionaires inherited their fortunes, as compared with one-third in the United States. Th e median age of a company of a European billionaire is nearly 20 years older than that of an American billionaire. Traditional sectors explain more than half of the rise in wealth in Europe; the financial sector and technology-related sectors together are largely responsible for the rise in US wealth. Th ere is some evidence that rents are higher in the United States than Europe, as not only is the number of US billionaires expanding rapidly, but US billionaires are also getting richer on average over time, especially when wealth is connected to resources, nontradables, or finance.

Find the article here

Posted by Pooja Shivaprasad, Associate Editor, Wealth Strategies Journal