Economic Analysis in Fiduciary Monitoring Disputes Following the Supreme Court’s ‘Tibble’ Ruling by D. Lee Heavner, Susan Mangiero 

D. Lee Heavner and Susan Mangiero have made available for download their article, “Economic Analysis in Fiduciary Monitoring Disputes Following the Supreme Court’s ‘Tibble’ Ruling”

The Abstract is as follows:

Fiduciary monitoring has become a hot topic as a result of the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Tibble v. Edison

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The Supreme Court Obergefell v Hodges Decision And New Financial Planning Opportunities For Same-Sex LGBT Couples

Michael Kitces writes about new financial planning oppertunities after the Supreme Court’s decisions requiring states to recognize same sex marriages.  His article begins as follows:

The Supreme Court’s decision creates several immediate new planning opportunities for same-sex married couples, particularly those who were previously married in another state but have

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Trust Reformation Was Not A Remedy For Failing To Complete An Estate Plan

Luke Lantta, of Bryan Cave, writes about the Appeals Court of Massachusetts’ decision in Lesanto v. Lesanto (Rule 1:28 decision), which reminds us that certain requirements must be met to reform a trust, contrasting the Lesanto case with several recent cases in which Massachusetts courts have permitted trust modification.

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Complications in Putting Unborn Spoiled Brats to Work: Using Lessons from Labor Supply Theory to Design Incentive Trusts by John Michael Grant

John Michael Grant, has made available for download his paper, “Complications in Putting Unborn Spoiled Brats to Work: Using Lessons from Labor Supply Theory to Design Incentive Trusts.”  The Abstract is as follows::

Labor Supply Theory has never been applied to estate planning, despite its relevance to the design of

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